The Beths

Ages 16 and up
Wednesday, April 10
Doors: 7pm Show: 8pm
$27
Tickets $27 in advance/ $32 once doors open

with ROCKET

New Zealand four-piece The Beths channel their longtime friendship into high-energy guitar pop with a smart lyrical bite. Guitarist, lead vocalist, and primary songwriter Elizabeth Stokes and guitarist Jonathan Pearce attended high school together before meeting up with longtime mates bassist Benjamin Sinclair and drummer Ivan Luketina-Johnston at the University of Auckland, where all four studied jazz. After gigging together in a variety of configurations, the quartet came together for a project exploring the pop and rock sounds of their youth. Everything clicked, and The Beths were born. Their debut EP, 2016's Warm Blood, overflows with explosive guitar riffs and infectious indie-rock hooks. Produced by Pearce and featuring all four members on joyful vocal harmonies that recall the best ‘60s pop, tracks like ace lead single “Whatever” and impossibly catchy standout  “Idea/Intent” earned the all-killer, no-filler release rave reviews from the New Zealand music press. 2018 was a breakout year for The Beths, beginning with a signing to Carpark Records. A beloved live act across Australia and New Zealand, the band toured the U.S. and Europe, where singles from the forthcoming album Future Me Hates Me got audiences beyond the bottom of the Pacific Ocean hooked on their ebullient sounds. The title track ‘Future Me Hates Me’ has been received enthusiastically, earning radioplay worldwide, and second single ‘Happy Unhappy’ was named ‘Song of the Summer’ by Rolling Stone Magazine. Their freshman album, Future Me Hates Me, also produced by Pearce, arrives on August 10th; fans of artists like Sleater-Kinney and Best Coast should remain on high alert for the first full-length from their new favorite band Short Bio: New Zealand four-piece The Beths channel their longtime friendship into high-energy guitar pop with a smart lyrical bite. 2018 has been a breakout year for The Beths, beginning with a signing to Carpark Records, a world tour, and the release on August 10 of their freshman album ‘Future Me Hates Me’.  The title track ‘Future Me Hates Me’ has been received enthusiastically by audiences worldwide, and second single ‘Happy Unhappy’ was named ‘Song of the Summer’ by Rolling Stone Magazine.
Rocket started in 2021, in an unmarked 8’ x 11’ practice space in Los Angeles, California. You wouldn’t know it walking past, but inside was the beginning of something special. The four members of the band, Alithea Tuttle (Bass, Vocals), Baron Rinzler (Guitar), Cooper Ladomade (Drums) and Desi Scaglione (Guitar) had all known each other for a very long time. Alithea and Cooper went to preschool together and the pair met Desi and Baron in high school. Having all grown up in Los Angeles, the four were exposed to the city’s musical influences at a very young age. Going to shows, record shopping and having a deep appreciation for the Los Angeles music scene were all a prerequisite for being a part of the community. Each member had their own unique taste but they bonded over a shared love for noise in bands like Sonic Youth, My Bloody Valentine and Dinosaur Jr. while also having an affinity for the ethereal and picturesque in bands like The Flaming Lips, Yo La Tengo and Radiohead. Before there was Rocket there was Desi and Alithea writing music in their room to pass the time during the lockdown of 2020. A large handful of demos were written with a huge sound in mind, but only so much noise could be made in a one bedroom apartment. It wasn’t until the two enlisted their friends Cooper and Baron to join that the full sound was realized. What started as a way to escape the mundanity of the pandemic quickly became an outlet for pure emotion and creativity. The group scraped together what money they had and rented the cheapest lockout space they could find and Rocket was formed. The group began rehearsing religiously, every day for months until their first show. That work ethic continues to this day, but in the beginning it was all they had to pass the time. Their first show was an outstanding success, playing on a bill with their good friends, Milly. It marked the beginning of a run of stellar performances including playing the Wiltern with The Regrettes and the Troubadour with Starcrawler. Then it was time to settle in and start the recording process for what would become their first EP. Having moved out of their shoebox lockout and into Cooper’s parents back house, the group finally had the space they needed to create the sound they wanted. In an incredibly fortunate series of events, the band was lucky enough to come across a 1970’s Yamaha PM-1000 recording console that was donated to a local church across from Cooper and Alithea’s elementary school. With their “new” gear, they set out to make the EP entirely by themselves. What came out was a project that fully embraces the group’s DIY approach. The EP is noisy and huge while also being bright and memorable, a combination of sound that is born purely out of their unique experience and influences. With an emphasis on live performances, Rocket has managed to play a steady stream of loud and exciting live shows over the last year. With one tour under their belt, the group is slated to hit the road for the month of October with Milly, touring the entire country and parts of Canada. After the release of their EP, the group will be working on their first full-length album. The story of Rocket is one of life long friends who, for better or worse, have an unexplainable bond and chemistry that goes beyond friendship. They have accomplished a tremendous amount in their first year but that pales in comparison to their ambition for the years to come. Before there was Rocket there was Desi and Alithea writing music in their room to pass the time during the lockdown of 2020. A large handful of demos were written with a huge sound in mind, but only so much noise could be made in a one bedroom apartment. It wasn’t until the two enlisted their friends Cooper and Baron to join that the full sound was realized. What started as a way to escape the mundanity of the pandemic quickly became an outlet for pure emotion and creativity. The group scraped together what money they had and rented the cheapest lockout space they could find and Rocket was formed. The group began rehearsing religiously, every day for months until their first show. That work ethic continues to this day, but in the beginning it was all they had to pass the time. Their first show was an outstanding success, playing on a bill with their good friends, Milly. It marked the beginning of a run of stellar performances including playing the Wiltern with The Regrettes and the Troubadour with Starcrawler. Then it was time to settle in and start the recording process for what would become their first EP. Having moved out of their shoebox lockout and into Cooper’s parents back house, the group finally had the space they needed to create the sound they wanted. In an incredibly fortunate series of events, the band was lucky enough to come across a 1970’s Yamaha PM-1000 recording console that was donated to a local church across from Cooper and Alithea’s elementary school. With their “new” gear, they set out to make the EP entirely by themselves. What came out was a project that fully embraces the group’s DIY approach. The EP is noisy and huge while also being bright and memorable, a combination of sound that is born purely out of their unique experience and influences. With an emphasis on live performances, Rocket has managed to play a steady stream of loud and exciting live shows over the last year. With one tour under their belt, the group is slated to hit the road for the month of October with Milly, touring the entire country and parts of Canada. After the release of their EP, the group will be working on their first full-length album. The story of Rocket is one of life long friends who, for better or worse, have an unexplainable bond and chemistry that goes beyond friendship. They have accomplished a tremendous amount in their first year but that pales in comparison to their ambition for the years to come.
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